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  • Writer's pictureWicked

Breakdown of a golf swing

An expert would break down a golf swing into the following components:

  1. Address: The first component of a golf swing is the address, which is the golfer's stance and position in relation to the ball. The golfer should stand with their feet shoulder-width apart, their knees slightly bent, and their weight evenly distributed on both feet. The ball should be positioned in the centre of the stance, with the clubhead resting behind the ball.

  2. Backswing: The backswing is the second component of a golf swing. This is where the golfer brings the club back and up, creating the potential energy needed for the downswing. The backswing starts with a slight rotation of the hips, followed by the arms and shoulders. The left arm (for right-handed golfers) should be straight, while the right arm should be bent at the elbow. The club head should remain on the correct swing plane, which is the angle of the club relative to the ground.

  3. Transition: The transition is the point where the backswing ends and the downswing begins. It involves a shift of weight from the right side to the left side, with a slight bump of the hips toward the target.

  4. Downswing: The downswing is the fourth component of a golf swing. This is where the golfer brings the club down and through the ball, generating clubhead speed and transferring energy to the ball. The downswing starts with a rotation of the hips, followed by the arms and shoulders. The left arm (for right-handed golfers) should remain straight, while the right arm should be close to the body. The club head should follow the correct swing plane, and the golfer should maintain their spine angle.

  5. Impact: Impact is the moment when the clubhead meets the ball. The golfer should make contact with the ball with a slightly descending blow, compressing the ball against the clubface. The hands should be ahead of the club head, and the left wrist (for right-handed golfers) should be flat.

  6. Follow-through: The follow-through is the final component of a golf swing. It involves the golfer continuing the motion of the swing after impact, allowing the club head to complete its natural arc. The golfer should finish in a balanced position, with their weight on their left foot and their body facing the target.

Overall, a golf swing involves the address, backswing, transition, downswing, impact, and follow-through. Practising each of these components individually and then combining them into a fluid motion can help golfers improve their swing and lower their scores.


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